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West and West Hill Streets
Nassau, N.P.
The Bahamas

(242) 328-5800

Bahamian art: Presenting. Uniting. Educating.

Exhibitions

Traversing the Picturesque: For Sentimental Value
Mar
22
to Jul 29

Traversing the Picturesque: For Sentimental Value

On March 22nd through July 29th, The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas presents the first of two historical surveys exhibitions that include works produced from 1856-1960 by visiting artists and expatriates, who were inspired by the then-colony's landscapes, people, luminescence, coastlines and seas and bustling lifestyles. Traversing the Picturesque: For Sentimental Value draws from several familiar and a few new collections to detail the breadth and scope of how The Bahamas has been framed within the popular global imagination and the impact of the colonial and outsider gaze on the development of a historical understanding of the nation.

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We Suffer To Remain
Mar
22
to Jul 29

We Suffer To Remain

In collaboration with the British Council, the NAGB will present the exhibition "We Suffer to Remain" featuring the evocative video installation "The Slave's Lament" by Scottish artist, Graham Fagen in tandem with visual responses by Bahamian artists Sonia Farmer, Anina Major and John Beadle. Fagen’s “The Slaves Lament” was exhibited at Scotland at the Venice Biennale in 2015 and "We Suffer to Remain" premise focuses on the fact that artists in postcolonial spaces have strong and embryonic reactions that can influence and build on the advancement and celebration of de-colonial art practices.

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Hard Mouth: From the Tongue of the Ocean
Jun
22
to Jun 2

Hard Mouth: From the Tongue of the Ocean

  • W Hill St Nassau, New Providence The Bahamas (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

How do we define ourselves? What does a dialect do and, within that vernacular, what does our dissent sound like? “Hard Mouth: From the Tongue of the Ocean” is a look at the way language–both verbal and visual–has shaped The Bahamas and how we view ourselves. From the way we speak, to the way that we voice our discontent, to the way we envision ourselves as women and as part of the Black Diaspora, “Hard Mouth” is a call to the “biggity” and bold nature of Bahamians and a foray into how this archipelago, around the Tongue of the Ocean itself, finds its voice.

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Drew Weech: A Self-Portrait
Mar
13
to Apr 15

Drew Weech: A Self-Portrait

  • W Hill St Nassau, New Providence The Bahamas (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

 In “A Self-Portrait” emerging Bahamian artist, Drew Weech, aims to provide - through both painting and sculpture - a window into what it's like to struggle with depression by presenting a body of work which vacillates between both the ephemeral and the perpetual aspects of the disorder.

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Trans: A Migration of Identity
Mar
5
to Apr 13

Trans: A Migration of Identity

Currently in its third year, the NAGB's travelling exhibition programme proudly presents "Trans: A Migration of Identity," which will begin its journey in Rock Sound, Eleuthera. Dissecting national identity through the lens of visual artists, the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas presents works that question and respond to our collective reality - one that is shaped by the movement of peoples of many origins: Africa, Europe, Asia, The Caribbean. 

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In Retrospect: The Whimsy of Peggy Jones
Jan
22
to Feb 25

In Retrospect: The Whimsy of Peggy Jones

The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas presents for the first time the work of Peggy Jones. "In Retrospect" showcases a collection of intimate paintings dating from the late 60s to the present day. Peggy Jones (US-born), emigrated to The Bahamas in 1955 and has been living and working here for the last 60 years. 

 

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Art of The Bahamas at the Elliott Museum
Dec
15
to Feb 26

Art of The Bahamas at the Elliott Museum

The exhibit Art of the Bahamas is a collaboration between the Elliott Museum and The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas. The exhibit includes more than 40 paintings on loan from NAGB and some from local artists who painted the Islands. The exhibition celebrates the creative spirit of these islands whose diversity of vision has inspired, and indeed continues to inspire the voices and visions of successive generations of artists. Art of the Bahamas, will run December 15, 2017 through February 26, 2018 at the Elliott Museum, 825 NE Ocean Blvd., Stuart, Florida. The exhibition is included with regular museum admission and is open everyday from 10 AM to 5 PM. For more information visit www.ElliottMuseum.org.

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Medium: Practices and Routes of Spirituality and Mysticism
Dec
14
to Mar 11

Medium: Practices and Routes of Spirituality and Mysticism

  • Temporary Gallery 1 + 2 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

From December 14th, 2017 through March 11th, 2018, The National Art Gallery of The Bahamas will present a survey of contemporary works that define and interrogate the critical edge of the birth and development of The Bahamas as a monolithic conservative Christian country. Through the development of opposing dialogues, the stronghold of rites of passage, the tenuous nature of buried histories and the fragility of personal stories, Medium: Practices and Routes of Spirituality and Mysticism will unearth encounters with a “thing” that lies amorphous, often beyond the power of words.

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Revisiting An Eye for the Tropics
Mar
31
to Apr 25

Revisiting An Eye for the Tropics

  • NAGB (Permanent Exhibition) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The new permanent exhibition, Revisiting An Eye for the Tropics, reconsiders both the National Collection and local private collections in regards to the colonial gaze and our post-colonial lives today, and features the work of over 20 artists. Opening March 31, 2017 Revisiting An Eye for the Tropics is a look into how our visual representation as a nation throughout history has been shaped as a result of the desires of colonial era tourism.

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